Brooks saddles last a long time. But not forever. If and when the sides start to flare out you can lace them together to pull them back where they should be. Some of their new saddles come with holes all along the edge and all you have to do is get a lace, run it from side to side, pull it to the tension you are after and tie it up. If yours does not have holes you can either punch them or drill them. Or we can do it for you!

There are lots of webpages that show you how to do this, but most of them are boring, frankly, with pictures of drills and markers and stuff. So here we present the Brooks saddle in question with an exploded Sturmey Archer 3 speed hub to class it up a bit.

Speaking of class, here we have the same Brooks saddle, now with 6 holes drilled per side, plus a can of champagne. How did we do it?! We used a caliper to reference the first hole on each side from the rivet on the nose, and then evenly spaced them back, about a centimeter up from the bottom edge. The holes are just big enough for the lace to pass through. *WARNING*: Don’t drink too much coffee before performing the measuring or drilling step! As to how we got a can of champagne, it was a shopwarming gift form our friendly neighborhood bar.

Finished project, should provide a few more miles, or years, of use for it’s owner!

Back on an old English lightweight, looking like it owns the place. Class dismissed.

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